Paedophiles crowd-funding child abuse images online

Paedophiles crowdfunding child abuse images on deep web version of Kickstarter… because they’re sick of selling films to one pervert who gives it away free

Paedophiles have created a website that allows them to crowd-fund child abuse images projects … because they’re sick of selling films to a single pervert who gives them away for free, it has been claimed.

The site, which works in a similar way to creative-funding platform Kickstarter, is hidden deep in the shadows of the dark web, rendering police powerless to stop it or track down its depraved hosts.

Exposed by Deep.Dot.Web, the website – whose name has been withheld – allows paedophiles to sell their home-made films and photographs with impunity while providing them with an easy way to raise capital to bankroll more ‘commercial grade child abuse images’.

Sickening: Its administrators even attempt to persuade users to pay their victims a 'fair wage', adding, 'The purpose of this site is so that your delicious lolis can afford college, not so that you can exploit them for your own personal gain.

Sickening: Its administrators even attempt to persuade users to pay their victims a ‘fair wage’, adding, ‘The purpose of this site is so that your delicious lolis can afford college, not so that you can exploit them for your own personal gain.

And in a further statement of sickening audacity, its administrators even attempt to persuade users to pay their victims a ‘fair wage’, adding: ‘The purpose of this site is so that your delicious lolis can afford college, not so that you can exploit them for your own personal gain. Of course we have no way to enforce this rule, but please respect it anyway since it is the right thing to do.’

The Deep Web is a seething matrix of encrypted websites – also known as Tor – that allows users to surf beneath the everyday internet with complete anonymity.

While it has existed for more than a decade, it came under the spotlight in November last year when police shutdown the Silk Road website – the online marketplace dubbed the ‘eBay of drugs’ – and arrested its creator.

But experts warn this has done next to nothing to stem the rising tide of such illicit online exchanges, which are already jostling to take advantage of this unregulated virtual world, whether they offer hitmen-for-hire, class-A drugs or havens for paedophiles. 

pae

On its homepage, the administrator explains: ‘Before, it was almost impossible to make commercial grade child abuse images, since as soon as they sell it to one person, that video is all over TOR for free.

‘This site aims to solve that problem by having many pedos each contribute a small amount of bitcoin towards the video. 

‘Once the total contribution reaches the asking price, the video is released here, on this site, to everyone who contributed at least 0.05 bitcoin. 

‘The producer is then paid the asking price, minus a 22 per cent commission. If the asking price is not reached after one month, then everyone who made a contribution is given their money back and the video is erased from the server.’

Shockingly, the site goes on to issue a ‘zero tolerance’ towards ‘rape or even coercing an unwilling child to participate’, Deep.Dot.Web reports.

‘Our biggest concern is the welfare of children who appear on this site,’ it says. ‘(Site name withheld) has a ZERO tolerance policy for rape or even coercing an unwilling child to participate. 

‘If there is even the slightest hint that your video contains an unwilling participant, it will not be posted on the site. Light bondage is acceptable as long as it’s just role playing and the child does not appear to be in distress.’

It adds that children under the age of three are not allowed to appear on the site because they ‘do not necessarily have the ability to communicate whether they like what you are doing to them’. Images or footage of children who are asleep are also banned. 

More shocking still, the administrator makes their most audacious claim: that they expect ‘producers’ to pay their ‘child actors’ a ‘fair wage’. 

tor

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