November 2018

£200-an hour escort mum who smashed baby son’s skull warned she faces jail

A mother who shook her baby son and beat his head against surface in an horrific attack has had her sentencing delayed but warned she will face jail.

Elizabeth Wilkins, 23 who works as a £200-an hour escort lashed out in anger and frustration and shook her son – breaking his ribs several times.

She then went on to give him brain damage when she hit his head against a hard surface.

Wilkins committed the sickening act on her own baby at her flat in Plymouth, Devon.

She had been studying law at Plymouth University. The defenceless boy was left fighting for his life.

After she was found guilty the judge ruled that she would go to prison – but adjourned sentence until November 9 for probation and psychiatric reports.

She was released on bail, though she is banned from contacting her son.

But sentencing has now been put back until December 6 at Plymouth Crown Court to allow longer for the reports to be prepared.

Wilkins shook him and fractured his ribs on several occasions before banging his head and fracturing his skull.

The child, just three months old, suffered brain damage and may have developmental problems as he grows up.

She spoke of her troubled past and made claims about the apparent horrendous abuse she suffered at the hands of her mother and partner.

Wilkins told a jury at her trial that her abusive mother forced her to eat her own guinea pig as a child and broke several bones in her body.

But jurors were instructed to decide whether they felt she was telling the truth about a number of claims, with her co-defendant and ex-partner’s barrister claiming she lived in a ‘parallel universe’.

Wilkins, who had been studying law at the University of Plymouth, tried to shift the blame on her former partner and co-defendant, 30-year-old Erick Vanselow.

He was cleared of failing to protect their son – having earlier been acquitted of assaults.

Willkins, suspended from her studies, denied assaulting her child causing grievous bodily harm with intent on September 22, 2016.

That was the day the boy’s head was smashed against a hard surface in the flat the parents once shared.

She also pleaded not guilty to assault causing actual bodily harm between August 31 and September 3 in 2016.

A jury unanimously found her guilty on both counts after seven hours of deliberations at the end of a three-week trial.

The panel was not invited to deliver verdicts on alternative counts.

The jury acquitted Mr Vanselow of a single count of failing to protect his son from his birth in July, 2016 until he suffered terrible head injuries on September 22.

Wilkins, originally from Weston Super-Mare, Somerset, stood with head bowed and eyes closed as the foreman read the verdicts.

Judge Peter Johnson told her: “Just because I am granting you bail it should not be taken by you as any indication of sentence. This is a very serious case and the inevitable sentence will be a prison sentence measured in years.”

The exact events which ended in the boy, who cannot be named by court order, in hospital will never be known.